Photo 1 Dec 587 notes

(Source: )

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Video 10 May 86 notes

arabarabarab:

People & Power-  Afghanistan: Power girls

People & Power follows the young Afghan women taking the battle for gender equality onto the streets of Kabul.

More than a decade after the Taliban were driven from power in Afghanistan, the plight of the country’s women remains dire, with threats and attacks by insurgents on women leaders, schoolgirls, and girls’ schools, and harassment of women for “moral crimes” such as running away from forced marriages or domestic violence.

I think when you are born a woman in Afghanistan you are taught every day to hate yourself .... We don’t know how to respect women, neither men nor women, no one knows it. Women don’t respect themselves. This is how everyone is treated, every woman, any woman who dares to take off her burqa and walk like a human being is treated like this.

- Noorjahan Akbar, an activist and founder of Young Women for Change

read more

Photo 17 Apr 32,652 notes Emirati teen Zahra Lari made figure skating history this week.
The 17-year-old not only became the first figure skater from the Gulf to compete in an international competition but the first to do so wearing the hijab, an Islamic headscarf.
YES YOU CAN!!!
This picture is just beautiful. 

Emirati teen Zahra Lari made figure skating history this week.

The 17-year-old not only became the first figure skater from the Gulf to compete in an international competition but the first to do so wearing the hijab, an Islamic headscarf.

YES YOU CAN!!!

This picture is just beautiful. 

via LawofWomen.
Photo 6 Apr 700 notes

(Source: avatar-erika)

Photo 28 Mar 67 notes invisible:

In this article for GOOD Magazine, the authors compare the KONY 2012 viral phenomenon to those of the Obama campaign in 2008 and Wikipedia’s SOPA and PIPA blackout. They says that Millennials “have little interest in being lectured at by experts who have not been able to resolve the world’s problems”. Janessa Goldbeck, former field dicrector for the Genocide Intervention Network, explains that “Social media platforms lower the barrier to entry and provide people with mechanisms to connect and get involved—hopefully for the long haul.” 
Read the article here.

invisible:

In this article for GOOD Magazine, the authors compare the KONY 2012 viral phenomenon to those of the Obama campaign in 2008 and Wikipedia’s SOPA and PIPA blackout. They says that Millennials “have little interest in being lectured at by experts who have not been able to resolve the world’s problems”. Janessa Goldbeck, former field dicrector for the Genocide Intervention Network, explains that “Social media platforms lower the barrier to entry and provide people with mechanisms to connect and get involved—hopefully for the long haul.”

Read the article here.

via .
Photo 28 Mar 224 notes
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Photo 26 Mar 1,227 notes juliosalgado83:

Transphobia, islamophobia and racism at its worst. 
Rest in power. 

juliosalgado83:

Transphobia, islamophobia and racism at its worst. 

Rest in power. 

Photo 26 Mar 198 notes rightsandhumanity:

Niger’s complicated hunger crisis

The annual hunger season is beginning once again in the vast, arid strip of land just below the Sahara desert, and the medics at Ouallam - a small town an hour’s drive north of Niger’s capital Niamey - have seen a sudden leap in admissions in the past week and are bracing themselves for an exceptionally tough few months before October’s harvest.
The United Nations’ World Food Programme expects that almost 400,000 children in Niger could find themselves so malnourished that they end up like those in Ouallam’s hospital. Nearly one in 10 are likely to die as a result.

rightsandhumanity:

Niger’s complicated hunger crisis

The annual hunger season is beginning once again in the vast, arid strip of land just below the Sahara desert, and the medics at Ouallam - a small town an hour’s drive north of Niger’s capital Niamey - have seen a sudden leap in admissions in the past week and are bracing themselves for an exceptionally tough few months before October’s harvest.

The United Nations’ World Food Programme expects that almost 400,000 children in Niger could find themselves so malnourished that they end up like those in Ouallam’s hospital. Nearly one in 10 are likely to die as a result.

Link 22 Mar 2,028 notes Why rape jokes are NEVER okay»

To all those men who don’t think the rape jokes are a problem:

I get it—you’re a decent guy. I can even believe it. You’ve never raped anybody. You would NEVER rape anybody. You’re upset that all these feminists are trying to accuse you of doing something, or connect you to doing something, that, as far as you’re concerned, you’ve never done and would never condone. 

And they’ve told you about triggers, and PTSD, and how one in six women is a survivor, and you get it. You do. But you can’t let every time someone gets all upset get in the way of you having a good time, right? Especially when it doesn’t mean anything. Rape jokes have never made YOU go out and rape someone. They never would; they never could. You just don’t see how it matters.

I’m going to tell you how it does matter. And I tell you this because I genuinely believe you mean it when you say you don’t want to hurt anybody, and that it’s important to you to do your best to be a decent and good person, and that you don’t see the harm. And I genuinely believe you when you say you would never associate with a rapist and you think rape really is a very bad thing. 

Here is why I refuse to take rape jokes sitting down…

Because 6% of college-aged men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word “rape” isn’t used in the description of the act—and that’s the conservative estimate. Other sources double that number (pdf). 

A lot of people accuse feminists of thinking that all men are rapists. That’s not true. But do you know who think all men are rapists?

Rapists do. 

They really do. In psychological study, the profiling, the studies, it comes out again and again. 

Virtually all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better. And more, these people who really are rapists are constantly reaffirmed in their belief about the rest of mankind being rapists like them by things like rape jokes, that dismiss and normalize the idea of rape

If one in twenty guys (or more) is a real and true rapist, and you have any amount of social activity with other guys like yourself, then it is almost a statistical certainty that one time hanging out with friends and their friends, playing Halo with a bunch of guys online, in a WoW guild, in a pick-up game of basketball, at a bar, or elsewhere, you were talking to a rapist. Not your fault. You can’t tell a rapist apart any better than anyone else can. It’s not like they announce themselves. 

But, here’s the thing. It’s very likely that in some of these interactions with these guys, at some point or another, someone told a rape joke. You, decent guy that you are, understood that they didn’t mean it, and it was just a joke. And so you laughed. 

Or maybe you didn’t laugh. Maybe it just wasn’t a very funny joke. So maybe you just didn’t say anything at all. 

And, decent guy who would never condone rape, who would step in and stop rape if he saw it, who understands that rape is awful and wrong and bad, when you laughed? When you were silent?

That rapist who was in the group with you, that rapist thought that you were on his side. That rapist knew that you were a rapist like him. And he felt validated, and he felt he was among his comrades. 

You. The rapist’s comrade. 

And if that doesn’t make you feel sick to your stomach, if that doesn’t make you want to throw up, if that doesn’t disturb you or bother you or make you feel like maybe you should at least consider not participating in that kind of humor anymore, not abiding it in your presence, not greeting it with silence…

Well, maybe you aren’t as opposed to rapists as you claim.

(Source: mohandasgandhi)

via LawofWomen.
Photo 11 Mar 227 notes invisible:

An Iraqi supporter currently living in Canada sent us this Arabic version of our poster. It says “Let’s put our hands together” on the bottom. Beautiful & amazing.

invisible:

An Iraqi supporter currently living in Canada sent us this Arabic version of our poster. It says “Let’s put our hands together” on the bottom. Beautiful & amazing.

via .

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